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Ear Wax Removal

FAQ 

  • Hearing Loss Symptoms.
    Hearing loss can vary in severity and may develop gradually over time, so it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. Here are some common symptoms of hearing loss: Difficulty hearing speech: This is one of the most common symptoms of hearing loss. People with hearing loss may have difficulty understanding speech, especially in noisy environments. Turning up the volume: If someone with hearing loss finds themselves consistently turning up the volume on the TV or radio, it may be a sign that they are experiencing hearing loss. Asking people to repeat themselves: People with hearing loss may frequently ask others to repeat themselves or may have difficulty following conversations. Ringing in the ears: Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a common symptom of hearing loss. It can be a constant or intermittent sound and may be more noticeable in quiet environments. Feeling fatigued or stressed: People with hearing loss may feel fatigued or stressed from the effort it takes to understand speech and other sounds. Withdrawing from social situations: Because hearing loss can make it difficult to communicate with others, people with hearing loss may avoid social situations or feel isolated. Misunderstanding what people are saying: People with hearing loss may misinterpret or misunderstand what others are saying, especially if there is background noise or other distractions. If someone is experiencing any of these symptoms, they should consider getting their hearing evaluated by a healthcare professional. Early diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss can help improve quality of life and prevent further damage to the hearing.
  • What is otoscopy
    Otoscopy is a medical examination of the ear canal and eardrum using an otoscope, which is a handheld instrument with a light and a magnifying lens. The procedure involves inserting the otoscope gently into the ear to inspect the ear canal and eardrum for abnormalities, such as infections, blockages, or injuries. The otoscope allows the healthcare professional to get a clear view of the ear canal and eardrum, and it can be used to diagnose conditions like ear infections, wax buildup, and other issues affecting the ear. Otoscopy is a common procedure performed during routine physical exams, and it is often used as a diagnostic tool for ear-related symptoms, such as pain, itching, or hearing loss.
  • What are the different types of otoscopy?
    There are several different types of otoscopy, including: Direct otoscopy: This is the most common type of otoscopy and involves looking directly into the ear canal and eardrum using an otoscope. Video otoscopy: This involves using a small camera attached to an otoscope to capture images or video of the ear canal and eardrum. The images can be viewed in real-time or recorded for later review. Pneumtic otoscopya: This involves using an otoscope with a special attachment that allows the healthcare professional to puff air into the ear canal and observe the movement of the eardrum. This can help diagnose conditions such as eustachian tube dysfunction or middle ear effusion. Microscopic otoscopy: This involves using a binocular microscope to provide a magnified view of the ear canal and eardrum. This can be especially useful for diagnosing conditions that are difficult to see with a standard otoscope. Otomicroscopy: This is a more advanced form of microscopic otoscopy that uses a high-resolution microscope and specialized tools to perform procedures such as earwax removal or ear surgery. The type of otoscopy used will depend on the patient's specific needs and the healthcare professional's preference and expertise. In some cases, multiple types of otoscopy may be used to provide a more complete evaluation of the ear.
  • What do you see in an otoscopy?
    During an otoscopy, a healthcare professional will examine the ear canal and eardrum for any abnormalities or signs of disease. The otoscope, which is a handheld instrument with a light and magnifying lens, is used to provide a clear view of the structures in the ear. Here are some of the things that a healthcare professional may see during an otoscopy: Earwax: Earwax is a common finding during an otoscopy. The healthcare professional will examine the amount, color, and consistency of the earwax and determine if it is impacting the ear canal or eardrum. Inflammation: Inflammation of the ear canal or eardrum may be seen during an otoscopy. This can be caused by infections, allergies, or irritation. Infections: Infections of the ear canal or middle ear may be seen during an otoscopy. These can be bacterial or viral in nature and can cause symptoms such as ear pain, fever, and discharge. Perforation: A perforation, or hole, in the eardrum may be seen during an otoscopy. This can be caused by infection, trauma, or pressure changes. Foreign objects: Foreign objects, such as beads or insects, may be seen in the ear canal during an otoscopy. Tumors: Although rare, tumors of the ear canal or middle ear may be seen during an otoscopy. Overall, an otoscopy is a valuable tool that allows healthcare professionals to examine the ear and diagnose a wide range of ear-related conditions.
  • What to expect when attending a wax removal appointment
    The first step to getting the wax removed from your ears is to run through a brief medical history questionnaire. This will allow the audiologist to determine if was removal is appropriate at this stage. We will then have a look inside your ears using video otoscopy. This means we us a small video camera to show you the inside of your ears. This will allow the audiologist to check the structures of the ear to ensure it is healthy before proceeding. On average the wax removal process takes about 5min to 10mins for each ear To finish we would they check the ear again using our video scope technology to show you the before and after results of removing the wax
  • Conductive Hearing Loss
    Conductive hearing loss is a type of hearing loss that occurs when sound waves are not conducted efficiently through the outer and/or middle ear. This can result from a variety of conditions, such as ear infections, earwax buildup, or abnormalities in the ear canal or middle ear. Some common causes of conductive hearing loss include: Earwax buildup: A buildup of earwax in the ear canal can block sound waves and cause hearing loss. Fluid in the middle ear: Fluid buildup in the middle ear, often due to an ear infection or allergies, can interfere with sound transmission. Perforated eardrum: A tear or hole in the eardrum can reduce its ability to vibrate and transmit sound. Ear canal blockage: Anything that blocks the ear canal, such as a foreign object or bony growth, can cause conductive hearing loss. Ossicular chain damage: The three small bones in the middle ear (the ossicles) can be damaged by infection, trauma, or other factors, reducing their ability to conduct sound. Symptoms of conductive hearing loss may include muffled or distorted sound, difficulty hearing in noisy environments, and a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear. Treatment for conductive hearing loss depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, earwax removal, surgery, or the use of hearing aids or other assistive devices. In some cases, conductive hearing loss may be reversible with appropriate treatment.
  • How do we hear?
    The 3 parts of the ear - the outer ear, middle ear and inner ear - all have roles in hearing Outher Ear - As the outer ear is visible, the sound waves are directed into the auditory part of the ear by the outer ear. The outer ear is constructed from cartilage and soft tissues and is also referred to as the pinna. As well as gathering sound, the pinna tells you where it is coming from, amplifies certain sound frequencies, and is also responsible for detecting where it is coming from. Approximately one inch and a quarter is the depth of the ear canal from the outer ear to the ear drum, and it is the ear canal that allows sound to be louder and clearer, as well as to be deeper and more powerful. Middle Ear - The middle ear consists of the eardrum and three tiny bones known as the Malleus, the Incus, and the Stapes, which are the smallest bones in the human body. Once sound waves reach the eardrum, they are transmitted to these three bones which connect the eardrum to the inner ear, playing a crucial role in our hearing ability. The bones transfer the vibrations from the eardrum to the fluid present in the inner ear. Inner Ear - The cochlea, located in the inner ear, plays a crucial role in the sense of hearing. It is a coiled structure that contains fluid. The vibrations produced by the small bones in the middle ear push the membrane known as the oval window, which in turn causes movement in the fluid inside the cochlea. This movement stimulates the hair cells present in the cochlea, which respond differently to various sounds and create nerve impulses. These impulses are carried to the brain by the acoustic nerve, and are processed in the auditory center of the brain, allowing us to differentiate between sounds and understand speech. This process is controlled by the central auditory system
  • What to expect when attending for your first hearing assessment appointment?
    The first step in the process is to obtain a brief medical history about your ears. This will allow the audiologist to select the next appropriate step in your treatment. We will then have a look inside your ears using video otoscopy. This means we us a small video camera to show you the inside of your ears. This will allow the audiologist to check the structures of the ear to ensure it is healthy before proceeding. Once this has been completed a full hearing test will be performed so the Audiologist can look at several factors - the amount of hearing loss that you have - the type of hearing loss that you have - whether any further medical referrals are appropriate. Following the hearing test, a demonstration of our hearing aid technology will be performed. This will allow you to experience first-hand the benefits of current hearing technology. Selecting the correct hearing aid for you is an important part of the process. The audiologist will advise you on the suitable models of hearing aid available based on your hearing test, preferred style and budget. When it comes to pricing, we will not be beaten on local prices and being an independent firm we can offer the lowest prices while still offering the best level of care to our customers. Most of our hearing aid come with a full 4-year warranty which includes annual hearing tests, servicing and repairs at no extra cost. We offer a full 60-day money back guarantee on all our hearing aids to ensure you are happy with the products. This gives the user plenty of time to try the aids out in real conditions.
  • How is an otoscopy performed?
    During an otoscopy, the healthcare professional will typically have the patient sit upright or lie down on their side. The healthcare professional may use an otoscope that is either handheld or mounted on a headband, depending on their preference and the patient's needs. The healthcare professional will gently pull the ear back and insert the otoscope into the ear canal, being careful not to cause discomfort or injury. The otoscope has a light and a magnifying lens, which allows the healthcare professional to examine the ear canal and eardrum for any abnormalities, such as redness, swelling, or discharge. If necessary, the healthcare professional may also use a small plastic attachment on the otoscope, called a speculum, to hold the ear canal open and provide a better view of the eardrum. During the examination, the healthcare professional may ask the patient to move their jaw or swallow to help visualize the structures in the ear. They may also gently puff air into the ear canal to test the movement of the eardrum. The otoscopy procedure is usually quick and painless, and the patient will typically be able to resume their normal activities immediately after the exam. The healthcare professional may discuss the results of the exam with the patient and recommend any further tests or treatment options if necessary.
  • What to expect when attending a wax removal appointment
    The first step to getting the wax removed from your ears is to run through a brief medical history questionnaire. This will allow the audiologist to determine if was removal is appropriate at this stage. We will then have a look inside your ears using video otoscopy. This means we us a small video camera to show you the inside of your ears. This will allow the audiologist to check the structures of the ear to ensure it is healthy before proceeding. On average the wax removal process takes about 5min to 10mins for each ear To finish we would they check the ear again using our video scope technology to show you the before and after results of removing the wax
  • What to expect when attending for your first hearing assessment appointment?
    The first step in the process is to obtain a brief medical history about your ears. This will allow the audiologist to select the next appropriate step in your treatment. We will then have a look inside your ears using video otoscopy. This means we us a small video camera to show you the inside of your ears. This will allow the audiologist to check the structures of the ear to ensure it is healthy before proceeding. Once this has been completed a full hearing test will be performed so the Audiologist can look at several factors - the amount of hearing loss that you have - the type of hearing loss that you have - whether any further medical referrals are appropriate. Following the hearing test, a demonstration of our hearing aid technology will be performed. This will allow you to experience first-hand the benefits of current hearing technology. Selecting the correct hearing aid for you is an important part of the process. The audiologist will advise you on the suitable models of hearing aid available based on your hearing test, preferred style and budget. When it comes to pricing, we will not be beaten on local prices and being an independent firm we can offer the lowest prices while still offering the best level of care to our customers. Most of our hearing aid come with a full 4-year warranty which includes annual hearing tests, servicing and repairs at no extra cost. We offer a full 60-day money back guarantee on all our hearing aids to ensure you are happy with the products. This gives the user plenty of time to try the aids out in real conditions.
  • 6. Learn to ‘Enjoy Hearing Again’
    A
  • 2. Choose your hearing system
    More info
  • 4. Schedule your fitting
    A
  • 1. Make an appointment for your hearing test.
    Tekst
  • 5. Follow up visits
    A
  • 3. Have your ear impression made
    A
  • Sensorineural Hearing Loss
    text
  • Hearing Loss Symptoms.
    Hearing loss can vary in severity and may develop gradually over time, so it is important to be aware of the signs and symptoms. Here are some common symptoms of hearing loss: Difficulty hearing speech: This is one of the most common symptoms of hearing loss. People with hearing loss may have difficulty understanding speech, especially in noisy environments. Turning up the volume: If someone with hearing loss finds themselves consistently turning up the volume on the TV or radio, it may be a sign that they are experiencing hearing loss. Asking people to repeat themselves: People with hearing loss may frequently ask others to repeat themselves or may have difficulty following conversations. Ringing in the ears: Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is a common symptom of hearing loss. It can be a constant or intermittent sound and may be more noticeable in quiet environments. Feeling fatigued or stressed: People with hearing loss may feel fatigued or stressed from the effort it takes to understand speech and other sounds. Withdrawing from social situations: Because hearing loss can make it difficult to communicate with others, people with hearing loss may avoid social situations or feel isolated. Misunderstanding what people are saying: People with hearing loss may misinterpret or misunderstand what others are saying, especially if there is background noise or other distractions. If someone is experiencing any of these symptoms, they should consider getting their hearing evaluated by a healthcare professional. Early diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss can help improve quality of life and prevent further damage to the hearing.
  • Conductive Hearing Loss
    Conductive hearing loss is a type of hearing loss that occurs when sound waves are not conducted efficiently through the outer and/or middle ear. This can result from a variety of conditions, such as ear infections, earwax buildup, or abnormalities in the ear canal or middle ear. Some common causes of conductive hearing loss include: Earwax buildup: A buildup of earwax in the ear canal can block sound waves and cause hearing loss. Fluid in the middle ear: Fluid buildup in the middle ear, often due to an ear infection or allergies, can interfere with sound transmission. Perforated eardrum: A tear or hole in the eardrum can reduce its ability to vibrate and transmit sound. Ear canal blockage: Anything that blocks the ear canal, such as a foreign object or bony growth, can cause conductive hearing loss. Ossicular chain damage: The three small bones in the middle ear (the ossicles) can be damaged by infection, trauma, or other factors, reducing their ability to conduct sound. Symptoms of conductive hearing loss may include muffled or distorted sound, difficulty hearing in noisy environments, and a feeling of fullness or pressure in the ear. Treatment for conductive hearing loss depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, earwax removal, surgery, or the use of hearing aids or other assistive devices. In some cases, conductive hearing loss may be reversible with appropriate treatment.
  • How do we hear?
    The 3 parts of the ear - the outer ear, middle ear and inner ear - all have roles in hearing Outher Ear - As the outer ear is visible, the sound waves are directed into the auditory part of the ear by the outer ear. The outer ear is constructed from cartilage and soft tissues and is also referred to as the pinna. As well as gathering sound, the pinna tells you where it is coming from, amplifies certain sound frequencies, and is also responsible for detecting where it is coming from. Approximately one inch and a quarter is the depth of the ear canal from the outer ear to the ear drum, and it is the ear canal that allows sound to be louder and clearer, as well as to be deeper and more powerful. Middle Ear - The middle ear consists of the eardrum and three tiny bones known as the Malleus, the Incus, and the Stapes, which are the smallest bones in the human body. Once sound waves reach the eardrum, they are transmitted to these three bones which connect the eardrum to the inner ear, playing a crucial role in our hearing ability. The bones transfer the vibrations from the eardrum to the fluid present in the inner ear. Inner Ear - The cochlea, located in the inner ear, plays a crucial role in the sense of hearing. It is a coiled structure that contains fluid. The vibrations produced by the small bones in the middle ear push the membrane known as the oval window, which in turn causes movement in the fluid inside the cochlea. This movement stimulates the hair cells present in the cochlea, which respond differently to various sounds and create nerve impulses. These impulses are carried to the brain by the acoustic nerve, and are processed in the auditory center of the brain, allowing us to differentiate between sounds and understand speech. This process is controlled by the central auditory system
  • What do you see in an otoscopy?
    During an otoscopy, a healthcare professional will examine the ear canal and eardrum for any abnormalities or signs of disease. The otoscope, which is a handheld instrument with a light and magnifying lens, is used to provide a clear view of the structures in the ear. Here are some of the things that a healthcare professional may see during an otoscopy: Earwax: Earwax is a common finding during an otoscopy. The healthcare professional will examine the amount, color, and consistency of the earwax and determine if it is impacting the ear canal or eardrum. Inflammation: Inflammation of the ear canal or eardrum may be seen during an otoscopy. This can be caused by infections, allergies, or irritation. Infections: Infections of the ear canal or middle ear may be seen during an otoscopy. These can be bacterial or viral in nature and can cause symptoms such as ear pain, fever, and discharge. Perforation: A perforation, or hole, in the eardrum may be seen during an otoscopy. This can be caused by infection, trauma, or pressure changes. Foreign objects: Foreign objects, such as beads or insects, may be seen in the ear canal during an otoscopy. Tumors: Although rare, tumors of the ear canal or middle ear may be seen during an otoscopy. Overall, an otoscopy is a valuable tool that allows healthcare professionals to examine the ear and diagnose a wide range of ear-related conditions.
  • How is an otoscopy performed?
    During an otoscopy, the healthcare professional will typically have the patient sit upright or lie down on their side. The healthcare professional may use an otoscope that is either handheld or mounted on a headband, depending on their preference and the patient's needs. The healthcare professional will gently pull the ear back and insert the otoscope into the ear canal, being careful not to cause discomfort or injury. The otoscope has a light and a magnifying lens, which allows the healthcare professional to examine the ear canal and eardrum for any abnormalities, such as redness, swelling, or discharge. If necessary, the healthcare professional may also use a small plastic attachment on the otoscope, called a speculum, to hold the ear canal open and provide a better view of the eardrum. During the examination, the healthcare professional may ask the patient to move their jaw or swallow to help visualize the structures in the ear. They may also gently puff air into the ear canal to test the movement of the eardrum. The otoscopy procedure is usually quick and painless, and the patient will typically be able to resume their normal activities immediately after the exam. The healthcare professional may discuss the results of the exam with the patient and recommend any further tests or treatment options if necessary.
  • What are the different types of otoscopy?
    There are several different types of otoscopy, including: Direct otoscopy: This is the most common type of otoscopy and involves looking directly into the ear canal and eardrum using an otoscope. Video otoscopy: This involves using a small camera attached to an otoscope to capture images or video of the ear canal and eardrum. The images can be viewed in real-time or recorded for later review. Pneumtic otoscopya: This involves using an otoscope with a special attachment that allows the healthcare professional to puff air into the ear canal and observe the movement of the eardrum. This can help diagnose conditions such as eustachian tube dysfunction or middle ear effusion. Microscopic otoscopy: This involves using a binocular microscope to provide a magnified view of the ear canal and eardrum. This can be especially useful for diagnosing conditions that are difficult to see with a standard otoscope. Otomicroscopy: This is a more advanced form of microscopic otoscopy that uses a high-resolution microscope and specialized tools to perform procedures such as earwax removal or ear surgery. The type of otoscopy used will depend on the patient's specific needs and the healthcare professional's preference and expertise. In some cases, multiple types of otoscopy may be used to provide a more complete evaluation of the ear.
  • What is otoscopy?
    Otoscopy is a medical examination of the ear canal and eardrum using an otoscope, which is a handheld instrument with a light and a magnifying lens. The procedure involves inserting the otoscope gently into the ear to inspect the ear canal and eardrum for abnormalities, such as infections, blockages, or injuries. The otoscope allows the healthcare professional to get a clear view of the ear canal and eardrum, and it can be used to diagnose conditions like ear infections, wax buildup, and other issues affecting the ear. Otoscopy is a common procedure performed during routine physical exams, and it is often used as a diagnostic tool for ear-related symptoms, such as pain, itching, or hearing loss.
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